Sunday, March 16, 2014

Desk Spinstering: The Night Circus on Audible.com

the-night-circus-book-cover, erin-morganstern-nanowrimo, black-and-white-and-red, contortionist-graphic
In my estimation, one of the most important office supplies a spinster could have is headphones. It helps me focus, and it cuts down on the amount of unsavory details I have to hear about my coworkers' personal lives. As such, when I was listening to This American Life this weekend, and Audible.com was suggested, I decided to try it. 

Ever Since I heard that Erin Morgenstern's The Night Circus was written during National Novel Writing Month, I've really wanted to read it. However, since I moved to Atlanta, I haven't been able to fit in as much as reading as I used to. So, Audible was a great solution. But below, I have a few notes.

1. Listening on Audible:
          While I really love that I finished two books this week (I also listened to The Awakening), I'm not sure my comprehension was as high as it could have been. With going in and out of meetings, answering emails, and generally concentrating on work, I'm left wishing I had paid more attention to the story. However, the way the reader said "chocolate," was so delicious, I constantly wanted to eat chocolate. 

2. Silk:
          Ok, so this is sort of knit-picky, but I have to say it. Lots of things in this book were made of or wrapped in "black silk." I just need to call out here that that tells me nothing. Silk is merely the fiber of which a fabric is made. It can take on many different weights, textures, weaves, and even knits. Every time something was "wrapped in black silk," I imagined washed silk, but I'm fairly sure this isn't what Morgenstern meant. She could have meant silk charmeuse or silk faille or silk crepe or...any other silk fabric. The world may never know.

3. Caramel:
          There was a lot of caramel in this book, and again, the way the reader said the word made me want to eat some caramel. In a very good way.

4. Voices:
          One good thing about listening to a book read on tape is that when there are accents, they aren't just left up to your imagination. If you're american and you're listening to a book with Irish accents (as in this book), sometimes you can get caught up on trying to effectively imagine the accents in your head while you're reading (if you do the accents at all), but when you are listening on tape, the voices are most often done for you. And that is wonderful like a bedtime story.

5. Kittens:
          This book had quite a few fluffy kittens, and I really appreciated that. 

So, now I will open the floor for discussion. Are there any more books a spinster should hear on Audible? What's the best one you've heard?

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